!Ebook ♷ That Which Should Not Be ☹ PDF or E-pub free

!Ebook ♿ That Which Should Not Be ♀ Miskatonic University has a long whispered reputation of being strongly connected to all things occult and supernatural From the faculty to the students, the fascination with other worldly legends and objects runs rampant So, when Carter Weston s professor Dr Thayerson asks him to search a nearby village for a book that is believed to control the inhuman forces that rule the Earth, Incendium Maleficarum, The Inferno of the Witch, the student doesn t hesitate to begin the questWeston s journey takes an unexpected turn, however, when he ventures into a tavern in the small town of Anchorhead Rather than passing the evening as a solitary patron, Weston joins four men who regale him with stories of their personal experiences with forces both preternatural and damned Two stories hit close to home as they tie the tellers directly to Weston s current missionHis unanticipated role as passive listener proves fortuitous, and Weston fulfills his goal Bringing the book back to Miskatonic, though, proves to be a grave mistake Quickly, Weston realizes he has played a role in potentially opening the gate between the netherworld and the world of Man Reversing the course of events means forgetting all he thought he knew about Miskatonic and his professor and embracing an unknown beyond his wildest imagination One of the finest additions to the Mythos I ve read in years, paying homage not only to Lovecraft himself, but to others who have added to the canon Told as a series of tales, this novel shines not only a light on the classics, but a ray of hope for the future of cosmic horror in literature Mr Talley has earned his place in the Lovecraft Circle, for he has done the Master proud.Highest recommendation. Brett J Talley offers a buffet of Lovecraft inspired tales in a novel full of stories that are contained in one overarching narrative the structure often reminded me of old omnibus films from Amicus Productions like Torture Garden and of course that great classic Dead of Night from Ealing Studios I appreciated the reminder.the main tale concerns a student of Miskatonic University sent to find an ancient tome in a remote village the story itself is quite involving and leads to a fun climax se Brett J Talley offers a buffet of Lovecraft inspired tales in a novel full of stories that are contained in one overarching narrative the structure often reminded me of old omnibus films from Amicus Productions like Torture Garden and of course that great classic Dead of Night from Ealing Studios I appreciated the reminder.the main tale concerns a student of Miskatonic University sent to find an ancient tome in a remote village the story itself is quite involving and leads to a fun climax set in R lyeh a place we should all visit at some point for its architectural attractions alone but that is really only a part of the novel while at the village, the student is almost immediately regaled with three supernatural adventures soon after, he is told another story, and even later he reads an ill fated ship captain s journal for me, familiarity does not breed contempt, so I have no issue with familiar scenarios I had different feelings about each of the stories the retread of Algernon Blackwoods awesome The Wendigo felt unnecessary and did nothing to improve the original still, even though I thought it was the weakest, it was definitely enjoyable my favorites were the story set in an insane asylum and especially the captain s journal the former was quite intriguing and atmospheric, the latter used a nicely unsettling narrator and I felt it could have gone on even longer than it did, which is always a good sign for me one of the things I particularly liked was the slight interconnectedness of those stories I could have usedof that overall the novel felt like a love letter to the classic writers of Weird Fiction and also a somewhat cocky introduction to the author s skill at writing in that classic vein I have no problem with cockiness and appreciate it when an author is confident of his abilities.this was the second novel in a row I ve read that linked the Cthulhu mythos to Christian mythology wait, should I have said mythology when talking about Christianity please, trolls, stay away anyway, I think that link is really fascinating and I m surprised it never occurred to me before I particularly enjoyed the connection to Gog and Magog those two are always trouble.oh, and yay Brett J Talley here is a comment from him regarding the current Goodreads censorship debacle or censorship I dunno, call it what you will but it s censorshipI don t understand exactly what s going on, but Goodreads shouldn t be deleting reviews, period People are smart enough to look at them on their own and make up their mind, and deleting reviews undermines the integrity of the site I ve been reviewing a few indie books lately So far, they ve all gotten four to five stars from me Am I being easy on these writers, sympathizing with their independent ventures Hell no Of all the indie books I ve read thus far, none have let me down I m sure that there is crap out there, crap meaning unedited writing that should is not, and perhaps never was ready for publishing, of which was the fear for small and or self published press before eBooks exploded onto the scene The latest o I ve been reviewing a few indie books lately So far, they ve all gotten four to five stars from me Am I being easy on these writers, sympathizing with their independent ventures Hell no Of all the indie books I ve read thus far, none have let me down I m sure that there is crap out there, crap meaning unedited writing that should is not, and perhaps never was ready for publishing, of which was the fear for small and or self published press before eBooks exploded onto the scene The latest one I ve read is That Which Should Not Be, by Brett J Talley Let me tell you, this book is a brilliant mix of not just the Cthulhu Mythos, but many other myths and legends, religions and cults While reading, I thought of Talley s book as an onion You keep peeling back layers and layers of detailed, rich stories that s both fascinating and frightening Yet the onion is one whole story Talley obviously has a strong grasp upon the things he writes about, with the Cthulhu Mythos taking center stage, and it was a lot of fun to pick out all the Lovecraftian references, such as a boat named Kadath.We start the story with Carter another reference , who is studying at Miskatonic University, of course One of his professors has an important job for him He must travel to an old port town called Anchorhead to retrieve a book called The Witch s Fire This book, like the Necronomicon, is a dangerous tome, to be handled only by the most experienced of sorcerer This leads Carter into an adventure where he is told tales of wonder and violent death at the hands of the Wengido, a cult, and an alternate universe on the sea Each story brings us closer to the main story, and when it all comes together, it s like an explosion of tentacles and black, leathery wings.If you enjoy the old classics by authors like Lovecraft and Blackwood, you will have no problem sinking into this one It is, in the end, a terribly fun ride That Which Should Not Be uses a frame narrative variation to tell a story of Carter Weston, a young student, who was asked by his professor to find a dangerous book and bring it to Miskatonic That is the main story After Weston arrives in Anchorhead where the book is supposed to be, he finds shelter from a terrible storm in an inn where he is invited to join four men Jack, Daniel, William and Captain Grey What one can say for sure is each man lost his innocence, his youth, in those days tha That Which Should Not Be uses a frame narrative variation to tell a story of Carter Weston, a young student, who was asked by his professor to find a dangerous book and bring it to Miskatonic That is the main story After Weston arrives in Anchorhead where the book is supposed to be, he finds shelter from a terrible storm in an inn where he is invited to join four men Jack, Daniel, William and Captain Grey What one can say for sure is each man lost his innocence, his youth, in those days that passed so long ago One can never truly know when he steps outside his door whether today will be a day that passes without consequence, or if it will be one that changes everything Each has a story to tell and Carter agrees to listen Most horror readers have already read at least one variation of those stories at one time or another, but I loved the way they are told and how each story adds to Carter s.There is a story of a wendigo, then there is one that takes place in an isolated asylum, the next is in a Carpathian mountains convent and then you have the one of a wandering ghost ship.The author uses a lot of names found in Lovecraft s stories Erich Zahnn, Gray s ship the Kadath, Henry Armitage from The Dunwich Horror is one of the characters here , but from other books too Dr Seward I could be a bit biased, but even with biblical themes I admit it was a bit distracting to read about God, crosses and stuff in a lovecraftian story, it was done really well It is written to make sense in this case Brett J Talley s That Which Should Not Be is a novel in stories which pays tribute to the classic works of horror fiction, particularly H.P Lovecraft and his Cthulhu mythos.Cartwer Weston is a student at the Miskatonic University in Arkham, Massachusets, a place where both the faculty and students have an interest in all things occult and supernatural So it is no surprise when one day Weston is approached by Dr Atley Thayerson, his supervisor, who tells him that an incredibly rare book has b Brett J Talley s That Which Should Not Be is a novel in stories which pays tribute to the classic works of horror fiction, particularly H.P Lovecraft and his Cthulhu mythos.Cartwer Weston is a student at the Miskatonic University in Arkham, Massachusets, a place where both the faculty and students have an interest in all things occult and supernatural So it is no surprise when one day Weston is approached by Dr Atley Thayerson, his supervisor, who tells him that an incredibly rare book has been rud to be located in a nearby town Thayerson claims that the tome in question is The Inferno of the Witch, a book just as powerful as the legendary Necronomicon, and asks Weston to venture to the nearby port town of Anchorhead, find it, and bring it back to the university for safekeeping.Weston does not need much convincing and sets off to Anchorhead at once He arrives in the town in the middle of a fierce storm, and after securing a room ventures into the local tavern for supper There he meets several of the locals, who recognize him as an outsider and begin to tell him their stories which all consist of their personal experiences with the occult and supernatural.This is a double edged sword On one hand, we have several different narrative threads which can potentially save the book from dullness and descending into boredom and can serve as an excellent showcase for the author s imagination on the other hand, we re largely missing character development of the protagonist who spends most of the book sitting in a tavern and listening to others, who also have a very limited amount of space and time to present themselves and tell their stories The problem that I have with most of contemporary horror fiction is not only the lack of original ideas and concepts which is understandably hard to overcome , but also the lack of atmosphere the feeling of dread, the uncanny, and pure fear The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown, wrote Lovecraft in his Supernatural Horror in Literature, all the way back in the 1920 s, when most of his works were just starting to be published for the first time Much water has flown in the rivers since that time Perhaps horror fiction has reached the point of such saturation where the unknown is simply not possible any, leaving us with stories retold and rewritten in different forms This is the case here The stories contained within That Which Should Not Be offer little new spin on the well known horror tropes While it s obvious that it s a homage to Lovecraft, who s the creator of Miskatonic, Arkham and the Necronomicon the basic plot of At the Mountains of Madness is told to Weston by a passing acquaintance other familiar horror elements are introduced, which don t really mingle The first story is essentially a retelling of Algernon Blackwood s The Wendigo an author included by Lovecraft as one of the Modern Masters in his Supernatural Horror It doesn t improve on the original or offer any real variation, and I felt that the trope of a group of men pursued by a dangerous creature deep in the woods was done much better by George R.R Martin in his prologue for A Game of Thrones, which was muchatmospheric, tense and simply interesting.Other elements from horror fiction which do not have much in common with Lovecraft get thrown in rather randomly Elements of Dracula appear there is a Dr Harker in one of the stories, while another features a long trek in a carriage in some forgotten eastern European wilderness which is very reminiscent of Stoker s work but without a vampire in sight There is a character named Batory, after countess Elizabeth Bathory, the well known sinister killer and a part of Hungarian folklore the Scholomance makes an appearance also known to most readers from Dracula All this lookslike eye winking to the reader and daring him to spot the cliches, and not a serious attempt at expanding Lovecraft s mythos.The most controversial addition is the attempt of introducing the Christian religion into Lovecraft s cosmos Lovecraft was an atheist, and his philosophical stance was the one of cosmic indifferentism where humans are particularly insignificant in the grand scheme of a meaningless and uncaring universe, which they could not understand and attempts at doing so would ultimately lead to insanity This is not the case with this work view spoiler Weston ultimately uses a religious symbol the Cross and with the power of Christianity kicks back Cthulhu himself into the depths of R lyeh This would never happen in a Lovecraft story who saw humans as being powerless against the Old Ones, and even suggested that they created us as a slave race but also is a lazy plot device, introduced to solve the situation which would otherwise lead to certain doom which likely would happen if Lovecraft wrote it a textbook example of a deus ex machina hide spoiler The book is not completely worthless and the attempts at setting up the atmosphere in its early chapters are admirable, even if trying to emulate Lovecraft s prose who was known for his penchant of extreme overwriting in order to recreate the language of the time before his birth can sometimes read like an unintentional parody of the writer who, to give credit to the author, did read like a parody himself at times Still, the attempts at setting the eerie atmosphere are not enough to overcome the open borrowing of earlier tropes, which on their own are not developed enough to offer any significant variation on a theme and do not compliment the Cthulhu mythos at all, and readers would be better advised to searching for original works by the old masters they will be a much better investment of their time Whew What a ride Early on it was a bit bumpy, with an overabundance of clich s and, what I originally thought to be a slight or creaky structural start The main character, Carter Weston, a student at Miskatonic University, is tasked by his professor, Dr Thayerson, with recovering an evil book, Incendium Maleficarum The Inferno of the Witch Weston arrives at the sea side town where the book is hidden, during a bad storm, and walks smack dab into a bunch of old guys, who almost seem to ha Whew What a ride Early on it was a bit bumpy, with an overabundance of clich s and, what I originally thought to be a slight or creaky structural start The main character, Carter Weston, a student at Miskatonic University, is tasked by his professor, Dr Thayerson, with recovering an evil book, Incendium Maleficarum The Inferno of the Witch Weston arrives at the sea side town where the book is hidden, during a bad storm, and walks smack dab into a bunch of old guys, who almost seem to have been waiting for him, with stories to tell If you re a fan of the genre, you ve seen this set up before, particularly in movies At this point Talley is really piling it on, both with clich d language and familiar horror tropes But I m still hanging in there, because I love EVIL BOOK stories, and this one, intriguingly, has TWO the other being the standard Lovecraftian Necromonicon What happens next is the old guys start telling their terrible tales At this point Talley s story telling takes over, and he s pretty good at it He s also clever, because he connects stories and myths, not normally associated with Cthulhu, in a way that is utterly believable and darkly fun For example, the first story is about a bunch of hunters encountering a Wendigo, which happens to be the title of a really great story by Algernon Blackwood This story is not in that category, but it s gory fun, with a substantial amount of wilderness dread Actually, it may even be the weakest story, but Talley is creating threads that will eventually bear fruit by the end of the book The following stories, one in a Carpathian convent, another in a New England asylum, had me recalling Hammer films of old They also had me recalling the great pulp writers, Howard, Burroughs, Lovecraft of course , and Poe in particular, his Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym All of these allusions, familiar character types, exotic settings, etc., add up, leaving you with the sense, in part at least, that the novel is paying homage to Pulp Horror But unlike Paul Malmont s wonderful Chinese Death Cloud Peril, Talley s effort absorbs the past and makes it his own Easier said than done, but he pulls it off Talley s not just tipping his hat to the past, but taking the stuff he digs, and reinventing it At one point, late in the book, the evil guy, wrapped in his evil cloak, along with his crew of zombies, invades Charleston Harbor That s some crazy and inspired stuff It had me thinking if there was a lost chapter to Arthur Gordon Pym, this scene would be it I can t think of any higher praise On Sale for.99 as of today 10 28 14 until November 4, 2014 Disclaimer This is a Lovecraftian influenced novel and I have never read H.P Lovecraft I have only seen some of the film adaptations made in the 80 s because my boyfriend was silly enough to let me choose the movies we rented back then Yes, back then when one had to travel to an actual video store to rent a movie From Beyond, Re Animator, The Unnamable How I loved them so but I m guessing these flicks probably took some liberties On Sale for.99 as of today 10 28 14 until November 4, 2014 Disclaimer This is a Lovecraftian influenced novel and I have never read H.P Lovecraft I have only seen some of the film adaptations made in the 80 s because my boyfriend was silly enough to let me choose the movies we rented back then Yes, back then when one had to travel to an actual video store to rent a movie From Beyond, Re Animator, The Unnamable How I loved them so but I m guessing these flicks probably took some liberties with Lovecraft s work.This book may take liberties with Lovecraft s intentions too or it may not Diehards will know the truth, but me Hell if I know What I do know is that, like many a themed short story collection, this one has a few that I enjoyed a littlethan the others but there weren t any duds and the style remains consistent throughout.It s written in what I m assuming is Lovecraftian style as if I would know It s heavy on the descriptive and atmospheric prose, the characters are typically intelligent fellows or hard laboring types and the cast is almost entirely made up of these men with an occasional woman usually with bad intentions making an appearance It s all about the men encountering strange, unearthly madness inducing monsters All of the stories are tied together by a legendary evil and a book that can bring forth the end of times for humankind Creepy stuff, oh yes, you will find it here.The basic story wrap around story that binds them all together, is one of a young, eager scholar who sets out to retrieve a legendary book after he s asked to do so by a professor he admires A storm arrives and he s stranded in a pub with a bunch of men who all have tall tales to tell Strangely convenient coincidence or Cthulu s influence Again, hell if I know.The men share their tales which are basically retellings of some of these classic horror gems Wendigo Insane Asylum Creepy Convent Ghost Ship They re all quietly creeptastic and it s easy to see where a few of them are going if you read too much horror as a kid I d have to say the Wendigo might be my favorite but I also loved the slow build of the asylum tale where the inmates far outnumber the staff and a young newbie is told, most ominously, They are in charge We just do what we can Yikes, you just know some bad shit is going to go down but it doesn t happen in a predictable way.All of the stories are enjoyable if you re in the mood for atmosphere and a slower pace and the wrap around story ties it all together so it never feels like a bunch of shorter stories tossed in for whatever reason They all interlock together nice and neatly and are genuinely unnerving This review has been approved by Cthulhu Kitty Sometimes you just gotta bow to the masters.In That Which Should Not Be, Brett J Talley s tribute to Lovecraftian horror, he does just that But he also manages to freshen up the Cthulhu Mythos, rustles some new scares into an old reliable war horse, and gives us what may be the best horror novel of 2011 Talley s debut novel is a delight of atmospheric horror while not flinching fromviolence scenes when it needs to A Miskato This review has been approved by Cthulhu Kitty Sometimes you just gotta bow to the masters.In That Which Should Not Be, Brett J Talley s tribute to Lovecraftian horror, he does just that But he also manages to freshen up the Cthulhu Mythos, rustles some new scares into an old reliable war horse, and gives us what may be the best horror novel of 2011 Talley s debut novel is a delight of atmospheric horror while not flinching fromviolence scenes when it needs to A Miskatonic University student to sent to retrieve an ancient book that, when combined with the Necronomiconwellyou Lovecraft enthusiasts can see where this is headed but the author leads us there with a flair I have not seen in a new writer for quite some time He s done his research for there are lots of sly references to Lovecraftian lore and even a few nods to Lovecraft s contemporaries like Algernon Blackwood But even if you are not familiar with Lovecraft, this novel will give you some original scares and sleepless nights I especially recommend this book to those who think the horror genre starts and end with vampires and zombies P.S No kitties were harmed in this review or the novel Caveat I was sent an advance review copy of this book by the publisher with an invitation to review if I felt it was worthy I enjoyed the book greatly and admired the skill with which it was written, so I chose to review This is NOT a paid review For those who like their horror Old School, That Which Should Not Be is a delicious treat Channeling a potent witches brew of H P Lovecraft, August Derleth, Algernon Blackwood, and Bram Stoker, Brett J Talley pulls out all the clas Caveat I was sent an advance review copy of this book by the publisher with an invitation to review if I felt it was worthy I enjoyed the book greatly and admired the skill with which it was written, so I chose to review This is NOT a paid review For those who like their horror Old School, That Which Should Not Be is a delicious treat Channeling a potent witches brew of H P Lovecraft, August Derleth, Algernon Blackwood, and Bram Stoker, Brett J Talley pulls out all the classic horror tropes to craft a dark foreboding pall of a story that is all his own The narrative structure tales within a tale, framed by the larger narrative told through a found manuscript draws not only from the Lovecraftian heritage, but from Stoker s Dracula as well In fact, the book is full of nods to icons of gothic fiction The setting begins in Lovecraft s mythical Arkham, Massachusetts, and moves northward up the rocky coast, where our hero meets a quartet of informants in a windswept tavern aptly called The Kraken Here the novel takes a Boccaccian turn, wherein a group of people trapped in a confined space swap tall tales to pass the time The main narrator, university student Carter Weston, listens entranced to loosely connected stories from a woodsman, a lawyer, a doctor, and a ship s captain whose tale comes after the guests have departed the snowbound tavern The four tales that make up the core of the book could stand well enough on their own as compelling novellas, but Talley skillfully weaves them into a larger tapestry based on Lovecraft s premise of the return of the Old Gods Drawing from the deep well of world folklore and legend, we have a Wendigo legend in the trapper s tale the lawyer s East European story of hidden rituals in a ruined mountain abbey that does not require the presence of vampires the doctor s tale set in a Massachusetts hospital for the insane reminiscent of the asylum scenes from Dracula complete with its own Renfield character as well as a doctor named Harker and a professor named Seward and, finally, the captain s tale of a cursed sea voyage Talley has the period diction nailed, with very few slippages Not an easy feat when you have five different narrators to voice The narrative style takes a page or two of getting used to, but once you ve settled into the time period, Talley s stories unfold with a decadent, mist shrouded 19th century atmosphere worthy of Poe himself The found manuscript or diary style of narration of necessity creates some distance from the reader, but Talley still manages to bring his various narrators vividly to life so that we care what happens to them and feel fully invested in their storylines Talley is at his best in setting mood and atmosphere, and his writing style truly shines in the passages describing weather and landscape, whether it s the mythic Miskatonic woodlands of Massachusetts, a snowy coastal nor easter, a careening carriage ride through the Carpathians, or moonlit vistas in old Arkham Especially captivating, and constituting the best written passages in the novel, are the seafaring episodes These are so well rendered one could easily believe the author s salty dog credentials come from dire personal experience It s no surprise that the final story, Captain Gray s tale paying homage to the Flying Dutchman legend and Coleridge s The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner, and even Poe s Lenore, is the best of the four and constitutes the book s gripping climax Captain Gray s narrative brings the main storyline back into the present and merges Weston s immediate quest with the larger premise of the novel the attempt by misguided humans to reawaken the Old Ones as described in Lovecraft s Cthulu mythos.There is much of Blackwood s style in Talley s writing Blackwood was described by his peers as a mystic, naturalist, conservationist, outdoorsman, and genuine intellectual interested perhapsin the terrors of the mind and the powers of the unseen than the physical acts of horror themselves This is not to say that That Which Should Not Be doesn t have its graphic, pure horror moments an early image of the Wendigo devouring its prey qualifies nicely, as does the bloody Sisters sacrifice in a cursed abbey But much of the book s satisfying gothic terror stems from the mind s contemplation of nighttime frights and what lurks, gibbering, beyond ordinary perception In old style gothic novel writing, what the reader congers in his or her imagination, with skillful prompting from the author, produces a much stronger, lingering sense of terror than detailed graphic descriptions, shocking as they may be at the moment of reading As we all know, the mind is a dark and dangerous place That s why reading Talley s book just before bedtime is not a good idea But then, once you ve started, it s impossible to stop